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Balzac’s Best Quotes

Balzac’s phrases have the essence of his narrative and the depth of his experience. Today we explore some of the most outstanding, do you accompany us?

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Choosing the best Balzac phrases is an arduous task. Almost all of his statements endow wisdom with a beauty that makes it difficult to make a fair selection. At the end of the day, we are talking about one of the greatest novelists of all time.

One of the most interesting aspects of Balzac’s phrases is the realism and sharpness with which he visualizes in the human condition. Honorato de Balzac was just that: a profound observer of individual and social behavior. This is reflected in their texts.

Another notable aspect of the work of this great novelist is the respect for human complexity. His ideas and characters are never one-dimensional or simple. He knew that in the same man there are contradictory forces, which originate the greatest greatnesses and the greatest miseries. These are some of the most outstanding Balzac phrases.

“All happiness depends on courage and work. I have had many periods of misery, but with energy and above all with illusions, I surpassed them all.”

-Honorato de Balzac-

Three blunt phrases from Balzac

The genius of the French realist novel tells us: “Forgetting is the great secret of strong and creative lives”. Just as memory fulfills a definitive role in the construction of identity, forgetfulness also plays a decisive role in the ability to move forward.

Another one of the phrases of Balzac indicates: “There is not a great talent without a great power of will”. No one better than him to say it. It is said that he worked up to 15 hours a day and spent hundreds of sleepless nights. That is why his great work The human comedy is monumental and eternal.

One more of his sentences states: “When you doubt your power, you give power to your doubt.” It is a play on words in which a great truth is enclosed. Insecurity nourishes itself voraciously. That’s why it’s better not to give it space.

Balzac, the thinker

Honorato de Balzac reflected a lot about life and its meaning. To the values ​​and their meaning. The result of these thoughts is this statement: “Our worst misfortunes never happen, and most of the miseries come in advance.” In short, thinking about the bad things to come is, in many cases, useless.

One of the recurring themes in Balzac’s phrases are vices and passions. In this regard he says: “Noble passions are like vices: the more they are satisfied, the more they grow”. It speaks to us of the face and seal of the passions: the positive and the negative. Both tend to grow as they are allowed to flow.

Another one of those phrases of Balzac that is a condensation of wisdom says: “In the great crises, the heart is broken or tanned”. The word “curtir”, in this case, refers to the original meaning of the word: to return flexible to prevent it from decomposing.

The relationships between people

This is a beautiful phrase of Balzac referred to friendship: “What makes friendships indissoluble and doubles their charm, is a feeling that lacks love, certainty.” He does not lack reason. While in romantic love there is always a mantle of uncertainty, friendship has a strength that gives certainty.

Also about relationships between people, Balzac points out: “While scoundrels reconcile after knifing each other, lovers break irrevocably with a simple look or word.” He is right too. The genuine love links are much more delicate than those based on convenience or custom.

Balzac was French and as a good Frenchman he also dedicated some of his reflections to the subject of dress, appearance and elegance. Your perspective on this is very particular. One of his sentences says:

“Elegance is the science of doing nothing like others, seeming to do everything the same way they do”.

Like many other great characters in history, Balzac’s life was not easy. He survived a childhood and adolescence full of abuse and a collapse that he called “intellectual congestion.” He lived a great love of a novel that lasted almost a lifetime and enjoyed the admiration of his contemporaries, leaving us a quarry of wisdom in the form of literature for those intrepid explorers who seek knowledge.

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