Advertisements

The Emotional Temperature in the World According to a Global Survey

After elaborating a complete study the Gallup analysis firm has concluded recently that in the world we live increasingly sad, angry and angry, something that weighs on global mental health.

Advertisements

After elaborating a complete study the Gallup analysis firm has concluded recently that in the world we live increasingly sad, angry and angry, something that weighs on global mental health.

People who inhabit the globe do not consider it a happy place at all, as revealed by the Gallup analysis firm that shared this week the results of a global survey designed to measure the emotional temperature of the world. His report suggests that people are now more sad, angry and more concerned than ever, findings that could have profound implications for global health.

For the preparation of the 2018 Global State of Emotions report, the consultant conducted more than 151,000 interviews with adults living in more than 140 countries. Among other things, they asked the respondents about how they felt the day before, if they smiled or laughed a lot and if they had experienced sadness or anger.

In analyzing the responses, the researchers found that the number of people who said they experienced anger increased by two percentage points from the previous year, while both concern and sadness increased by one percentage point, setting new historical highs for these three emotions.

Research has noted the impact that repeated negative feelings can have on a person’s physical health: a Harvard study has linked anger with a high risk of heart attack and stroke, while other research has suggested that concern and chronic sadness may be signs of anxiety disorders and depression, which in turn carry a higher cardiac risk.

If people continue to experience these negative emotions in greater numbers, we could move towards a future in which the world’s population is increasingly unhealthy, a situation that is linked to the growing gap between rich and poor, job insecurity and poverty. unemployment, climate change, political uncertainty, wars or natural disasters.

Advertisements