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A Swiss Billionaire Donates 1 Billion to Save 30% of the Planet

Hanjsjörg Wyss, a Swiss millionaire, will donate 1 Billion dollars over the next decade with the aim of saving nearly a third of our planet-scorched, threatened by climate change.

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Hansjörg Wyss, a Swiss billionaire, will donate 1 Billion dollars over the next decade with the aim of saving nearly a third of our planet-scorched, threatened by climate change.

2030 is the deadline to stop an irreversible climate change, a phenomenon caused by the selfish and destructive human hand whose consequences are already perceived today in galloping loss of biodiversity, rise in sea level, acidification of waters, increase in the temperatures, thaw, drought, desertification of soils and natural disasters more and more frequent and virulent.

To curb climate change, it is fundamental to fundamentally modify the industry, consumption habits and the economic system, protect natural spaces, eliminate plastic, reduce the use of fossil fuels to make way for a renewable energy mix or comply with the precepts required in the Paris Pact. In fact, 15,000 scientists from 184 countries have signed a manifesto that includes 13 concrete and urgent measures to safeguard the planet from environmental destruction.

Investing money and resources in environmental protection is also essential. In this sense, today we echo the good news: Swiss millionaire Hanjsjörg Wyss will donate 1 billion dollars over the next decade to save 30% of the world’s land and oceans in 2030, as he announced in an article written in the New York Times, warning about the extreme situation of the planet, in which species of animals and plants disappear 1,000 times faster than before the arrival of humans. An essential key collected by Wyss is the importance of protecting at least half of the planet to save it from mass extinction.

The money invested by the tycoon will seek to press for more ambitious goals, will support local conservation efforts and will urgently reduce the gap between what is currently protected and what should be protected. The investment will also cover public awareness and the financing of scientific research that seeks sustainable alternatives.

Taking advantage of his article, Wyss has called for greater collaboration of companies, governments and institutions to recover areas such as the Caribbean coral reefs, the glaciers of Argentina or the elephant population in Zimbabwe.

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