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The Remnants of Google+ are Called Currents

Google began to delete the content that users had posted on Google+ on April 2nd, and the truth is that the company has been in a hurry to finalize what was their social network, because there is no trace of what was.

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Google began to delete the content that users had posted on Google+ on April 2nd, and the truth is that the company has been in a hurry to finalize what was their social network, because there is no trace of what was. When you try to enter any personal profile, an error message appears.

“Google Currents was a social app to share content.”

However, although Google announced the closure of the public version of Google+, it had confirmed that it would keep its version for companies. In fact, some of the functionalities continue to be active, but the company has changed its name to avoid confusion. Now, what’s left of Google+ is called Currents.

It is curious the choice of the name since Currents was already the name of another service that Google had in its day. Google Currents was an app that curated content and was integrated into Google+.

It was useful when it came to sharing publications, although it was replaced a few years ago by Google Play Newsstand. The name was released and now Google rescues it for the remainder of the Google+ corporate version.

But what can the user find on Google+ now? Well, or rather, in Currents … Well basically a place to share content with colleagues or work and in which to discuss it, offering advice or opinions.

In other words, nothing new that can not be done in LinkedIn, Facebook Workplace or in a thousand other applications. Google now wants to focus its efforts on developing a social tool that is useful for corporate environments, but may also come too late.

If it does not offer a clear differentiating value, with Currents we may be facing a new social failure of the search engine company, and there are already a few in its 20-year history.

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