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Reflective Children and Forbidden Education

Recently, we addressed in a previous article, the importance of encouraging the capacity for reflection in children. We saw how certain characteristics of family communication, influence when raising reflective children, with greater opportunities to understand and interact more constructively with the environment.

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Recently, we addressed in a previous article, the importance of encouraging the capacity for reflection in children. We saw how certain characteristics of family communication, influence when raising reflective children, with greater opportunities to understand and interact more constructively with the environment.

In these lines, we want to share with you a different material, which covers this and other aspects but from the school. This is “La educación prohibida”, an Argentine documentary film, which deals with the education that currently predominates in the West and alternative education systems. For this, it has interviews with educators from Spain and Latin America specialized in these systems.

Forbidden Education“, was released in 2012 and since then has captured the interest of millions of people. It covers pedagogies such as the Waldorf, Montessori, Cossettini, Popular Education, among others within the so-called progressive education.

Progressive education, consists of a group of pedagogical movements emerged at the end of the nineteenth century and developed during the twentieth, which analyze and criticize traditional education. These alternative systems understand that the current model in schools is authoritarian, formalistic, fosters competitiveness and reduces learning to a transmission of knowledge, which often does not relate to the interests of the student and where the student has an passive role. Hence, they pointed to a participatory, active, collaborative, practical, democratic, vital, motivating education that meets the needs of each child.

Schematically, we can say that in general they affirm that:

  • Although on a human level we are all equal, individual needs vary a lot and require attention.
  • In traditional education, the contents are divided by areas without interrelation. So it is pertinent to connect them, so that they invite constant learning.
  • Grades are subjective, they change from one teacher to another, not faithfully reflecting the child’s performance. It is the child, who should evaluate how he feels about the work he does, in order to maintain connection and control over his own process.
  • If a child can not advance in an area, it is convenient to allow him to advance in another area that is more accessible to him, as well as to facilitate the small ones to help each other.
  • A teacher who does not give so many orders and listen more, will leave more room for the child to make proposals, and becomes accustomed to reflect and decide in his life.
  • Many of these pedagogies, among other things, prefer not to group infants by age because they understand that they will not necessarily have the same preferences and abilities. Hence, they provide a context that facilitates communication among all, beyond age.

On the other hand, and also in general lines, some of the arguments opposed to alternative systems maintain that “Forbidden education” seems more propaganda of such systems, since it would have been necessary to include positions in favor of the conventional system, in order to achieve impartiality and greater intellectual rigor.

Likewise, there are those who consider that it would be convenient to seek an interrelation of these alternative systems with traditional education, understanding that in this way richer processes would be achieved that would benefit both approaches.

The truth is that it is a film that exposes openly and quite clearly, different educational experiences with which many people have no contact. Since The Mind is wonderful, we maintain a neutral stance on the subject, being as always our sole objective, to bring tools to our readers, which help to make visible and reflect on different aspects of everyday life.

Divided into ten episodes, which introduce and walk the viewer through the practices of these alternative systems, inside and outside the schools, “Forbidden education” is a film with the peculiarity that its creators encourage its free dissemination, inviting us to enjoy it while we question education.

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