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May Must Change her Brexit Proposal to Vote for the Third Time

The president of the British House of Commons, John Bercow, has warned on Monday that the government can not return to vote on the Brexit agreement if its proposal is “substantially the same” as that rejected by Parliament last week .

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The president of the British House of Commons, John Bercow, has warned on Monday that the government can not return to vote on the Brexit agreement if its proposal is “substantially the same” as that rejected by Parliament last week.

The deputies discarded last Tuesday by a large majority the pact proposed by the prime minister, the conservative Theresa May, who in January had also been knocked down.

“If the government wants to present a new proposal that is not the same, or substantially the same, as the one that assessed the chamber on March 12, that would be completely acceptable,” Bercow said in a statement to the Commons.

“What the government can not do legitimately is to send the same proposal back to the camera,” stressed the president of the British lower house.

Bercow cited a convention dating back to the early seventeenth century whereby deputies can not vote more than once on the same issue in a single parliamentary course.

Last Tuesday’s vote was legitimate, stressed the president of the Commons, because May’s proposal included new documents, agreed by London and Brussels, on the plan that had already been voted on January 15.

Bercow has argued that there have been “rumors” in Westminster about the possibility that the government will call a third, “and even a fourth”, vote on the Brexit agreement.

Its warning, has wielded, pretends to set the conditions that the Executive must fulfill so that a third voting “can be celebrated of legitimate way in this parliamentary course”.

The negotiations of May

The Prime Minister negotiates, for her part, against the clock with her partners from the Northern Ireland Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and the most Eurosceptic faction of the Conservative Party, to try to change their position and support the exit conditions that the Executive has agreed with the European Union (EU).

May plans to request a three-month extension if it can approve the pact before the European summit scheduled for Thursday, but has warned that the extension may be longer if it reaches that appointment without an agreement ratified by Parliament.

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