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Scientists Manage to Reactivate Cells of a 28,000-year-old Mammoth

New advances of giant in genetic matter: Japanese scientists manage to reactivate cellular tissue of Yuka, a woolly Siberian mammoth extinct does nothing more and nothing less than 28,000 years.

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New advances of giant in genetic matter: Japanese scientists manage to reactivate cellular tissue of Yuka, a woolly Siberian mammoth extinct does nothing more and nothing less than 28,000 years.

Is it possible to return extinct animals to life in the future? Although we are still light years away from that advances in genetics are breaking through to leave us with open eyes. And recently, Japanese scientists have managed to reactivate cells of Yuka, an ancient woolly mammoth that lived for the last time about 28,000 years ago, before being mummified in the frozen ice lands of the permafrost of northern Siberia.

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The well-preserved remains of the mammoth were discovered in 2010 in the Siberian republic of Yakutia, and arrived from Vladivostok to the Japanese port of Tottori in 2013. Now, by implanting nuclei of Yuka cells in mouse oocytes, Asian researchers They have been able to awaken traces of biological activity in this extinct giant mammal of the Ice Age. “This suggests that, despite the years that have passed, cellular activity can still occur and parts of it can be recreated,” genetic engineer Kei Miyamoto of Kindai University told AFP.

In their experiment, the researchers extracted the bone marrow and muscle tissue from Yuka’s remains, and inserted the less damaged core-like structures that could be recovered in live mouse oocytes – germ cells – in the laboratory, as shown in the next image.

In total, 88 of these nuclei were collected from 273.5 milligrams of mammoth tissue, and once some of these nuclei were injected into the oocytes, several of the modified cells showed signs of cell activity that precede cell division. “In the reconstructed oocytes, the mammoth nuclei showed the assembly of the spindle, the incorporation of histones and partial nuclear formation,” the authors explain in their article.

“However, the complete activation of the nuclei for the excision was not confirmed.” Despite the weakness of this limited biological activity, the discovery is remarkable, pointing out in the words of the researchers themselves that “cell nuclei are maintained, at least partially, even in a period of more than 28,000 years.”

Before the alarms sound, Miyamoto recognizes that there is still a long way to go before a resurrection in the style of the Jurassic Park of this species long since disappeared. A better technology is needed to undertake new advances in this matter, but for the time being, research can provide a new platform to evaluate the biological activities of cell nuclei in extinct animal species.

“Once we get the cell nuclei that are maintained in better conditions, we can hope to advance the research to the stage of cell division,” Miyamoto told The Asahi Shimbun. The least damaged samples, the researchers suggest, could hypothetically allow the possibility of inducing additional nuclear functions, such as DNA replication and transcription.

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