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China Wants to Ban Underaged from Broadcasting Live Video

Most of the social networks place the minimum legal age established for a minor to have a profile in 13 years, although some countries also impose their own legislation in this regard, which prevails over business indications.

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Most of the social networks place the minimum legal age established for a minor to have a profile in 13 years, although some countries also impose their own legislation in this regard, which prevails over business indications. For example, in Spain the legal minimum age is 14 years.

“In recent weeks, videos that encouraged young girls to become pregnant have become popular.”

Every user of a social network has access to the features that it includes, all of them, including the broadcasting of live videos. Any Facebook user can carry out retransmissions through Facebook Live; anyone who uses Twitter could make retransmissions through Periscope – integrated into the social network itself – and the same would happen to users of the recently released LinkedIn Live, on Instagram Live or on YouTube, where live video can also be retransmitted.

However, in China – a country known for the strict censorship it imposes on Internet services – now the authorities are considering prohibiting minors from using applications to broadcast live videos.

The rule, which if approved would mean having to be 18 years old to be able to use services like those indicated -or equivalents in the country, given that social networks like Facebook are prohibited-, has been raised by the Communist Party after having popularized in the last few weeks some contents among minors certainly “questionable”.

For example, Kuaishou and ByteDance (the company that owns TikTok) have seen how in their video platforms -these do have the approval of the Chinese authorities- content that encouraged young women in the country to become pregnant spread like wildfire.

Both platforms have formally apologized but the government wants to go further and force them to ensure that only users who have reached the age of 18 can access the functions that allow live broadcasts.

The inability to control the content that is broadcast live is something that not only concerns the Chinese government. Although Beijing is trying to control to impose censorship, in the West social networks such as Facebook have faced cases in which young people, live, committed crimes or even attempted to self-harm.

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