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Twitter Users are Machiavellian, According to a Study

Social networks are the target of a multitude of psychological studies that try to classify users according to the platform they use.

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Social networks are the target of a multitude of psychological studies that try to classify users according to the platform they use. Normally these studies classify users across a spectrum of terms, good and bad. But a study published by the Psychology Journal in Popular Media Culture has introduced a term rarely used in relation to users of social networks: Machiavellians.

“A study shows that Twitter users are more manipulative than those who only use Facebook.”

The study focuses specifically on the difference between users of Twitter and Facebook and those who use Facebook only. The study indicates that Twitter users are more open-minded than those who only use Facebook, but surprisingly, they are also more Machiavellian.

The study was carried out by researchers from Brunel University London, who carried out two experiments. In the first, they studied 349 Twitter users and 269 people who only used Facebook. This first experiment resulted in Twitter users scoring higher in areas such as creativity and tolerance.

The second, in which 255 users of Twitter and 248 of Facebook participated, the results indicated that, indeed, the Machiavellian tendencies were more pronounced among the users of the first social network.

The study uses the classic conception of Machiavellian: the end justifies the means, no matter how manipulative it may become. Apparently, people with these tendencies that use the social network of the bird, publish content related to “intellectual challenges”, such as politics, research, etc …

But do not spread panic. Being a Twitter user does not have to mean that our chances of being manipulated by a Machiavellian person increase. The study concludes that this type of people use this social network to achieve social connections that do not reach the Internet, mainly.

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