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The US and the Taliban Achieve a Peace Agreement in Afghanistan

The United States and the Taliban have reached a peace agreement that would include the withdrawal of US troops, the commitment to prevent the use of Afghanistan by terrorist groups and a ceasefire prior to further talks with the government of Kabul, as has been advanced this Monday the newspaper The New York Times.

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The United States and the Taliban have reached a peace agreement that would include the withdrawal of US troops, the commitment to prevent the use of Afghanistan by terrorist groups and a ceasefire prior to further talks with the government of Kabul, as has been advanced this Monday the newspaper The New York Times.

“We have a draft of an agreement in principle that has to be worked on before it becomes a pact,” the US special envoy for Afghanistan Zalmai Khalilzad said in an interview with the newspaper.

Khalilzad has stressed that “the Taliban have committed themselves to do whatever is necessary to prevent Afghanistan from becoming an internal platform for terrorist groups.” However, he added that in spite of having “confidence” in the agreement “the details have yet to be specified”.

The Taliban have pledged to do whatever is necessary to prevent Afghanistan from becoming an internal platform for terrorist groups

After six days of talks with the Taliban’s political delegation in Doha, which ended on Saturday, Khalilzad has traveled to Kabul, where he has informed Afghan President Ashraf Ghani of the progress of the meeting.

The US delegation, he said, will meet again with the Taliban to discuss the participation of the Afghan authorities in the talks, an objective that has always met with the refusal of the insurgents, considering the Afghan government as a mere “puppet” from Washington.

“There is much information that we have discussed an interim government: No, I have not entered into any of that discussion,” said the US envoy, who has indicated that the objective is for the Taliban and the Afghan government to return to the negotiating table. to talk directly.

After meeting with Khalilzad, President Ghani has urged “the Taliban to begin serious negotiations with the government,” in a speech to the nation broadcast on the state television channel.

In recent months, insurgents and Americans have held several meetings in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar, and the Taliban also met with Iranian representatives in Tehran at the end of last December.

Also at the end of December, the president of the United States, Donald Trump, has announced his intention to withdraw a large part of the 14,000 soldiers that Washington still has deployed in Afghanistan.

17 years of conflict

This withdrawal is seen as a first step in fulfilling that electoral promise to reduce the US military presence as much as possible, although many warn that it may increase chaos in the country.

After almost 17 years of armed conflict, the Afghan government controls around 55% of Afghanistan’s territory, and the Taliban dominate around 11%, while the rest of the territory is in dispute, according to the Special Inspector General for the Reconstruction of Afghanistan (SIGAR) of the United States Congress.

The war in Afghanistan, the longest in the history of the US, has claimed the lives of 2,419 US soldiers and Washington has spent more than 900,000 million dollars in the conflict.

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