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Bing is Already Available in China After Two Days Disappeared

Microsoft has already confirmed that access to Bing in China has been restored just two days after the initial cut, without providing further details on the causes of the incident.

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Microsoft has already confirmed that access to Bing in China has been restored just two days after the initial cut, without providing further details on the causes of the incident.

This week, all the alarms were up in Redmond: Microsoft’s search engine, Bing, was no longer available in China without prior notice. The last North American engine with presence in the Asian giant had accepted the rules of censorship of the communist regime, so no one explained why this interuption had occurred in the service (unless it is understood within the China-US trade war) .

Well: everything has been in a scare. Microsoft has already confirmed that access to Bing has been restored just two days after the initial cut, without providing further details on the causes of the incident.

This return to normality makes more sense given the relationship between the North American multinational and the red authorities. In fact, Microsoft has been collaborating with local companies for ten years to provide their services and gain acceptance from the Chinese government for more than a decade. In addition, it has a research and development center in China that has given life to important products and positioned experts who have later founded large companies in the country.

Recall that, in any case, accept the censorship requirements of the Chinese government is very criticized by human rights groups. In fact, after being blocked in 2010, a few months ago came to light Google’s plans to return to operate within China censoring their results according to government rules. The project was rejected not only by entities external to the company, but by its own workers who opposed being part of Chinese censorship.

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