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Why Sugary Drinks are a Real Danger to your Kidneys

Although, due to its high sugar content, its regular consumption was discouraged by the main health organizations, a new study links fruit drinks and sugary soft drinks with an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

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Although, due to its high sugar content, its regular consumption was discouraged by the main health organizations, a new study links fruit drinks and sugary soft drinks with an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

Since the beginning of the industrial age, the presence of sugar -especially refined, extremely harmful- has increased exponentially in the numerous foods we eat. The consequences of its consumption for health are terrible, since sugar is linked to an increased risk of overweight, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or dental caries, reduces appetite and is associated with several types of cancer.

Now, a study whose findings have been collected by the clinical journal ‘Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology‘ (CJASN), reveals that a greater collective consumption of sweetened fruit drinks, soft drinks and water is associated with a greater probability of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). The research collected from a community study of African-American adults in Mississippi, United States, adds to the broad body of evidence on the negative effects of sugar consumption.

Casey Rebholz of the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and his team prospectively analyzed 3,003 African American men and women with normal kidney function who enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study. ‘ The intake of beverages was evaluated by means of a food frequency questionnaire administered at the beginning of the study in 2000-2004, following up the participants until 2009-2013. Among the 3,003 participants, 185 – 6% – developed CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) at a mean follow-up of 8 years.

Examining the information, the researchers found a common pattern: consumption of a beverage pattern consisting of soft drinks, sweetened fruit drinks and sweetened or flavored water was linked to a higher risk of developing CKD. Participants in the upper tertile of consumption of this consumption pattern had 61% more likely to develop CKD than those in the lower tertile. Those responsible for the study criticized the lack of information on the risks of kidney diseases associated with various types of beverages.

The WHO published in 2015 its guidelines on the consumption of sugar, which should not be more than 10% of the daily calories in both children and adults. While on a 2,000-calorie diet should not exceed 50 grams per day of sugar, the average in Western Europe is around 100 grams, twice the amount recommended by the World Health Organization.

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