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This is How the IoT Challenge is Faced by the Two Main Telecommunications Operators in the US

The Internet of Things is a business opportunity of 224,000 million dollars in five years on a global scale that operators do not want to miss.

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The Internet of Things is a business opportunity of 224,000 million dollars in five years on a global scale that operators do not want to miss.

If not too long ago we woke up in the Internet era, now we get up and go surrounded by a multitude of devices that do not allow us to connect to the Network of Networks, but are themselves who connect and exchange information without it for us. It is the Internet of Things (IoT), a paradigm that will take us to about 25,000-50,000 million connected objects (according to what estimates are consulted) for a little less than five years.

All a deployment of the technique that must be based on something, in networks that allow that enormous traffic of continuous information something real. A business opportunity of 224,000 million dollars in five years on a global scale that operators do not want to miss.

AT & T

At a breakfast during CES 2019, held in Las Vegas (USA), David Allen, director of Advanced Product Development at AT & T, explained that the American giant is committed to offering all possible connectivity options: mobile networks (3G, 4G and future 5G), satellite, short-range networks and, especially, low energy consumption options such as LTE-M or Nb-IoT.

“Traditional mobile networks are very useful and we have them very exploited and developed, but it is complicated to integrate them into very small devices of just a few dollars,” said Allen. “LTE-M and NB-IOT allow us to face these environments where the cost factor is especially important”. An alternative, the Narrowband-IoT, significantly more secure and efficient in terms of capacity and latency with respect to traditional Wi-Fi, compatible with all kinds of devices such as Amazon Dash buttons, automation kits for home automation or even keys and locks smart

“Simplifying the user experience is how we are really going to democratize the adoption of the Internet of Things. It is not surprising that Bluetooth or WiFi are default options when connecting different objects within the home, such as the refrigerator as a virtual assistant, “said David Allen, whose company -AT & T- has experience in these cases (no in vain, it manages 2.4 million connected devices and 3.3 million connected cars at the moment). “The extraction of data must also be simple, the installed modules must be perfectly integrated with each other and be certified. At AT & T we have managed to certify IoT devices based on modules in less than 10 days, when a few years ago it took us up to a month, “he said.

Verizon

Steve Szabo, Global Head of IoT at Verizon, has a similar opinion to that of his colleague: there is a need to approach the Internet of Things from a very broad perspective of network technologies, each one suited to a different market need, but with a prominent role of the 5G (which the firm is already extending in several cities in the United States) and the NB-IoT for proximity communications.

“Access to real-time data allows for superior features analytics and fully responsive managed services,” explained the Verizon executive, who highlighted the need to incorporate security by design in all IoT devices and networks that must endure them.

“We still have to solve enormous challenges in terms of the cost of networks and their energy consumption, interoperability between different operators, certification or design of objects quickly and the protection of data exchanged in both private and public networks,” he added. executive. “Without forgetting the particular barriers that operators have in this area, such as the existence of multiple platforms and price plans of the ‘telco’, regulatory restrictions in key markets, limitations of roaming and the limited continuity of services.”

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