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Spain is the Main Objective of Cyber Attackers in the Internet of Things

The majority of IoT attacks come from Brazil (18% of them), followed by those originating in China and Japan.

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The majority of IoT attacks come from Brazil (18% of them), followed by those originating in China and Japan. At the receiving end, unfortunately, is Spain, which suffered 80% of all traffic monitored as a suspect in the first half of 2018.

Classic attacks on servers and personal computers continue to be a pressing concern for companies and individuals around the world, but every time another cyber threat is rising in the particular ranking of digital fears: the campaigns that target the connected devices that make up the Internet of Things.

This boiling ecosystem (Gartner estimates 20 billion connected objects by the end of next year – with a dramatic increase of 143% in just two years – while other studies speak of between 30,000 and 50,000 IoT devices by the middle of the decade) is extremely attractive for cybercriminals and that, moreover, today does not enjoy the same security measures (or awareness) that other elements of our digital life.

This is highlighted by a recent study of F5 Labs according to which attackers are increasingly putting their sights on the IoT environment in front of other more classic actions against web services, applications or email servers. And, the most curious thing is that in the arena of Internet of Things cyber threats, the map of the usual protagonists (USA ‘vs’ Russia ‘vs’ Ukraine ‘vs’ Israel ‘vs’ North Korea) is quite different .

Thus, most IoT attacks come from Brazil (18% of them), followed by those originating in China and Japan. In the receiving end, unfortunately, is Spain, which suffered 80% of all traffic monitored as a suspect in the first half of 2018. Next to us in this nothing honorable position we find Russia and Hungary.

Most of the time, cybercriminals target routers, IP cameras, DVRs and CCTV. In addition, the F5 Labs report details that the 50 major attacks recorded came from new IP addresses, which can mean only three things: either there are many new people involved… or the hackers are using new systems… or both.

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