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So Spoke Satoshi Nakamoto

Contrary to what many believe, Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of Bitcoin, maintained extensive correspondence with several developers and actively participated as soon as the debate sparked his project since the publication of the white paper in October 2008.

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Contrary to what many believe, Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of Bitcoin, maintained extensive correspondence with several developers and actively participated as soon as the debate sparked his project since the publication of the white paper in October 2008. In April 2011, Satoshi erased his Bitcoin.org email address and disappeared without explanations, as do the heroes once they have fulfilled their mission.

So spoke Satoshi Nakamoto

January, 3rd 2009: Chancellor on the edge of the second rescue plan for banks.

January 28th, 2010: I really wanted to find some way to include a short message, but the problem is that everyone would be able to see the message. As much as you remind people that the message is completely public, it would be an accident waiting to happen.

February 14th, 2010: I am sure that in 20 years the volume of transactions (in bitcoins) will be huge, or nonexistent.

February 21st, 2010: In the absence of a market to establish the price (of bitcoin), estimates based on the cost of production are a good approximation. The price of any product tends to gravitate toward the cost of production. If the price is below cost, then production slows down. If the price is above cost, you can get benefits by generating and selling more. At the same time, the increase in production would increase the difficulty, transferring the cost of generation to the price. In later years, when the new generation of currency is a small percentage of the existing supply, the market price will dictate the cost of production instead of the other way around.

February 26th, 2010: What do you think about symbol B with two lines through the external part? Can we live with that as our logo?

June 17th, 2010: The nature of Bitcoin is such that once the release of version 0.1 the core of the code is engraved in stone for the rest of his life.

June 18th, 2010: (I’ve been working on the design of Bitcoin) since 2007. At some point I was convinced that there was a way to do this without the need of any confidence, and I could not resist to keep thinking about it. Good part of the work was the design of the code. Fortunately, until now all the questions raised have been things that I have previously considered and planned.

June 18th, 2010: (I have planned to create a free bitcoins generator). When it becomes too difficult for mortals to generate 50 BTC per block, new users will be able to obtain some coins to test the system.

June 21st, 2010: The lost coins only make the rest of the coins worth a little more. Think of it as a donation for everyone else.

June 22nd, 2010: We should not postpone it forever until all possible functions have been created. There will always be one more thing to do.

July 5th, 2010: I’m sorry to be a party pooper. Writing a description of (Bitcoin) for the general public is very difficult. There is nothing to relate it to.

July 5th, 2010: We do not want to promote it as the “anonymous currency” … (or) “the currency beyond the reach of governments”. I am definitely not making such an assertion.

July 16th, 2010: The SHA256 will not be broken by the advances anticipated by Moore’s law in our lives. If it were to break, it will be due to some advance in the cracking method.

July 18th, 2010: (The documentation) is only intended for intrepid programmers who read the source code.

July 20th, 2010: Bitcoin is an implementation of the Wei Dai b-money proposal published in cypherpunks in 1998 and the Bitgold proposal by Nick Szabo.

July 29th, 2010: If you do not believe me or do not understand, I do not have time to try to convince you, I’m sorry.

August 5th, 2010: While I do not think Bitcoin is practical for smaller micro payments at this time, over time storage costs and bandwidth will continue to fall. … Whatever size of micro payments you need to make, it will eventually be practical. I think in 5 or 10 years, bandwidth and storage will be trivial issues.

August 5th, 2010: I’m not saying that the network is impervious to DoS attacks. I think that most P2P networks can be attacked with DoS in numerous ways.

August 5th, 2010: Free transactions are pleasant and we can keep it that way if people do not abuse them.

August 7th, 2010: The utility of possible exchanges thanks to Bitcoin will be much higher than the cost of electricity used to maintain the system. Therefore, not using Bitcoin would be a net cost.

August 27th, 2010: Sorry, I’ve been so busy lately that I’ve been leaking messages and I still can not keep up.

August 27th, 2010: Bitcoins do not generate any dividend or have the potential to generate it, therefore, they are not like stocks.

December 5th, 2010: No, do not take it (to Wikileaks). The project has to grow little by little so that the software can be strengthened along the way. Bitcoin is a small beta community in its infancy … and the heat that it would bring would probably destroy us at this stage.

December 11th, 2010: It would have been nice tContrary to what many believe, Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of Bitcoin, maintained extensive correspondence with several developers and actively participated as soon as the debate sparked his project since the publication of the white paper in October 2008.o get this attention in any other context (instead of being associated with WikiLeaks). WikiLeaks has kicked the hornet’s nest, and the swarm is heading towards us.

December 12th, 2010: We should have a gentlemen’s agreement to postpone the “GPUs arms race”, as long as we can, for the good of the network. It is much easier to get new users if you do not have to worry about the GPU drivers and their compatibility. It’s nice that someone with only one CPU can compete fairly evenly at the moment.

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