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Does Climate Influence Violent Attitudes?

A study by Spanish scientists, which will be published this December in the journal Science of The Total Environment, links heat waves with aggressiveness. According to this study, climate does influence violent attitudes.

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A study by Spanish scientists, which will be published this December in the journal Science of The Total Environment, links heat waves with aggressiveness. According to this study, climate does influence violent attitudes.

According to other studies, conducted by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley and Princeton University, changes in climate are closely linked to many of the manifestations of violence that occur on the planet.

Relatively small deviations from normal temperature or rainfall have substantially increased violent attitudes and the risk of conflict in different places and points of history. The authors were able to demonstrate that the Earth’s climate is a variable with a power of influence over our behavior and mood higher than expected.

Some examples that this investigation exposes are the peaks of domestic violence in India and Australia, the increase of aggressions and murders in the USA. and Tanzania. Ethnic violence in Europe and South Asia, land invasions in Brazil, the use of police force in the Netherlands and civil conflicts in the tropics.

“It is strange that a revolution takes place in a climate of calm and common sense. The brains are unbalanced, the imagination is bewildered, darkened, populated with ghosts”.

-Émile Zola-

The climate, a cause of the conflict

These new studies could have important implications when it comes to estimating how climate change that we are experiencing around the planet can affect us. Many global climate models project an increase in global temperature of at least 2 degrees centigrade over the next half century.

The scientists found three types of conflict related to changes in climate. In addition, they saw that the conflict responds more consistently to temperature, with a positive relationship between high temperatures and increased violence or violent attitudes in 27 studies.

These researchers collected information from 60 existing studies containing 45 different data sets to draw joint conclusions in a common statistical framework. “The results were surprising,” explains Solomon Hsiang, lead author of the study and an adjunct professor of Public Policy at the School. Goldman from the University of California at Berkeley.

“Autumn was busy killing and winter sweeping.”

-Camilo José Cela-

The more heat, the more macho violence?

According to a study prepared by several Spanish scientists, there is a relationship. Belén Sanz-Barbero, Cristina Linares, Carmen Vives-Cases, José Luis González, Juan José López-Ossorio and Julio Díaz are the co-authors of ‘Heat waves and the risk of violence at the hands of intimate partners’.

A study that will be published next December 10 in the magazine ‘Science of the Total Environment’ in which they assure that the risk of feminicide at the hands of a couple increases three days after a heat wave. Based on the large number of women who have reported or claimed to have suffered an episode of violence at the hands of their partner, scientists have stressed that it is “extremely important” to identify the factors that can precipitate violent attitudes in these cases.

Based on these data, the scientists argue that the risk of feminicide at the hands of the couple increased during the three days after the heat wave, while police reports of sexist violence increased one day after the same.

Likewise, calls for attention to victims of gender violence increased five days later. In particular, the risk of a woman being killed by a couple is the one that increases the most: it does so by more than 28%. “Our results suggest that heat waves are associated with an increase in violence at the hands of an intimate partner,” the researchers argue in the conclusions of the article.

“To the extent that climate denial impedes technical progress, it could accelerate real disasters.

In turn, they can make catastrophic thinking even more credible.

You can start a vicious circle in which the policy is reduced to ecological panic.”

 

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