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WiFi Could be Used to Detect Weapons and Bombs

Rutgers University of New Jersey has discovered that waves used by WiFi connections can be used to detect weapons and explosives in public places.

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Rutgers University of New Jersey has discovered that waves used by WiFi connections can be used to detect weapons and explosives in public places. The waves of a WiFi connection can pass through balls and measure metal objects, as well as estimate the volume of liquids contained with a 95% reliability.

“The waves produced by a WiFi device can pass through bags and bags and measure the objects that are inside.”

In this way, WiFi could become a low-cost alternative for security in public places such as airports, museums, stadiums or administrative buildings. The alternatives currently used include metal detector arcs and X-ray machines, more expensive in comparison.

The team detected 15 types of objects in six different types of bags and suitcases. Hazardous objects were recognized in 99% of the cases. When the dangerous objects were wrapped with several layers, the hits decreased to 90%.

All that is needed is a WiFi device with two or three antennas that can be integrated with a normal wireless network. The operation is simple, and is based on how the electromagnetic waves bounce when entering the suitcases and bouncing against the objects inside.

One of the project leaders, Yingying Chen explains: “In large public areas it can be difficult and expensive to establish detection systems like those that exist in airports. We wanted to design a method that would reduce the resources needed for this type of security devices. “

If implemented on a large scale, it would reduce the cost and complexity of installing security devices, so these would be much more widespread and available, which would increase security in places with large agglomerations. “This is an increasingly pressing need,” they added from the research team.

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