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What is the Cache Memory and What Is It Used For?

If you have a website or a blog it has probably happened to you that you update some content and it does not appear, everything remains as before. You compulsively press the publish button, but nothing happens. And after a while, out of nowhere, Pouf! it appears. This is due to the cache memory.

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If you have a website or a blog it has probably happened to you that you update some content and it does not appear, everything remains as before. You compulsively press the publish button, but nothing happens. And after a while, out of nowhere, Pouf! it appears. This is due to the cache memory.

Imagine that you have a bookstore with three books (that to simplify things we will call them we will call A, B and C). Imagine that out of five customers, four ask you for the book A. Instead of going to the store every time, probably what you would do is take a good number of books A and leave them on a shelf next to you, leaving the trip to the store only for books B and C that ask you a lot less. It is a much more efficient way of working.

Well, that shelf is basically the cache.

What is a web cache?

Every time you want to consult a web page, your browser sends a request to the server in question. The response of this comes in the form of static elements in the form of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, video images and others. Your browser interprets them, along with the rest of the source code, and transforms it into what you see on your screen.

The browsers reserve a space in their memory to store this data, so that if you make a query about them you do not have to repeat the same request and obtain the same results. He already has them there, like you with the book A in the example of the bookstore. If you want to access a page again, the browser analyzes the elements it has in its cache memory and only asks for the new ones, reducing the consumption and loading speed.

Why do you have trouble introducing new content?

The one who controls the cache of the page is the server, which introduces a certain life time to each static element of the web (which can be from a few minutes to a few weeks). Until this time expires, the browser will not request new data from the server. This causes that, sometimes, of problems at the time of showing new content.

But beware, this does not mean that the cache is something that has problems, especially if it is well configured. On the contrary, it is an element that usually improves the user experience thanks to a higher loading speed and a lower data consumption, while on the other hand it also relieves the work done by the server. All this implies a better performance of the page, something that Google likes very much and that possibly ends up having a positive impact on your SEO positioning.

While this occurs on a permanent basis, problems are something that, however striking, occur on time.

Plugins to manage the cache in WordPress

There are some hosting services that are responsible for managing the cache of your site, however you can also use one of the many WordPress plugins that allow you to configure it. These are some of the best.

Except WP Rocket, the rest of plugins are free or have a free version, so you can try them without problems to see which is best suited to your needs, or simply which you like more.

I hope this entry has helped you to better understand what the cache memory is, what it is for and why, even though the advantages are clear, sometimes it gives you problems.

See you soon!

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